Discussion:
Cessation is an experience of epistemological reflection
(too old to reply)
Hondo
2012-02-13 15:47:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
"Freedom is a reversal of the evolutionary course of prakriti,
which is empty of meaning for the purusha; it is also the
power of conciousness in a state of true identity" (Y.S. 4.34).

The most ancient sustained expression of yogic ideas is
found in the early discourses of the historical Buddha, thus
Patanjali's conception of freedom is related to the ancient
Buddhist view that the source of suffering is the craving for
permanence in a universe of impermanence.

According to Barbara Stoler-Miller in 'Yoga: Discipline of
Freedom', "Both the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path
articulated in the Buddha's first discourse are elements that
underlie the classical yoga
system."

Two striking examples of this are Patanjali's use of the word
'nirodha' in the opening definition of yoga as 'citta-vrtti-nirodha',
that is, "Yoga is the cessation of the turnings of thought" and
the statement that "all is suffering, dukkha, for the wise man"
(52).

'Dukkha', suffering, and 'nirodha', cessation, are crucial terms
in Buddhist vocabulary and the doctrine of suffering is the core
of what Buddhists believe the Buddha taught after gaining
enlightenment.

Patanjali's 'ashtang' eight-limbed practice is a parallel to the
eight-limbed path of Shakya the Muni.

Work Cited:

"Yoga: Discipline of Freedom"
By Barbara Stoler-Miller
Acclaimed translator of the Bhagavad Gita.
Bantam Wisdom Editions 1998
p. 5, 52.
Ajay Shah
2012-02-21 20:11:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Hondo
"Freedom is a reversal of the evolutionary course of prakriti,
which is empty of meaning for the purusha; it is also the
power of conciousness in a state of true identity" (Y.S. 4.34).
The most ancient sustained expression of yogic ideas is
found in the early discourses of the historical Buddha, thus
Patanjali's conception of freedom is related to the ancient
Buddhist view that the source of suffering is the craving for
permanence in a universe of impermanence.
According to Barbara Stoler-Miller in 'Yoga: Discipline of
Freedom', "Both the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path
articulated in the Buddha's first discourse are elements that
underlie the classical yoga
system."
Two striking examples of this are Patanjali's use of the word
'nirodha' in the opening definition of yoga as 'citta-vrtti-nirodha',
that is, "Yoga is the cessation of the turnings of thought" and
the statement that "all is suffering, dukkha, for the wise man"
(52).
'Dukkha', suffering, and 'nirodha', cessation, are crucial terms
in Buddhist vocabulary and the doctrine of suffering is the core
of what Buddhists believe the Buddha taught after gaining
enlightenment.
Patanjali's 'ashtang' eight-limbed practice is a parallel to the
eight-limbed path of Shakya the Muni.
"Yoga: Discipline of Freedom"
By Barbara Stoler-Miller
Acclaimed translator of the Bhagavad Gita.
Bantam Wisdom Editions 1998
p. 5, 52.
VICE VERSA

Loading...