Discussion:
Excerpt from "The Buddha Speaks"
(too old to reply)
willytex
2009-11-25 21:14:10 UTC
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One day a bright and intelligent student of the Buddha asked if he
could
fetch his younger brother to join the order. Delighted, the Buddha
agreed.

But the younger brother, although kind and gentle, turned out to be
slow
and dull witted. He could understand nothing of his studies and asked
to
go home so that he wouldn't waste the Buddha's time or let down his
brother.

"There's no need for you to give up," said the Buddha. "You should
not
abandon your search for liberation just because you seem to yourself
to
be thick witted. You can drop all the philosophy you've been given
and
repeat a mantra instead - one that I will now give you."

He gave the young monk a mantra and sent him away affectionately.

But soon the monk was back, this time even more humiliated. "My
beloved Buddha, I can't remember the mantra you gave me and so I can
no longer practice."

The Buddha kindly repeated it for him. But twice more he came back,
having forgotten it each time. So the Buddha gave him a simplified
form.

But when this too slipped completely out of his mind, he hardly dared
visit the Buddha again. "There's an even shorter version," the Buddha
told him, with a smile, "It's just one syllable. See if you can
remember
that." But he could not.

In his hut, he broke down and wept. His brother found him and was
furious, feeling that his own reputation was now sullied. He told the
young monk to go home, and so the boy left the hut and sadly made his
way along the path. As he neared a grove of trees, he met the Buddha
coming from it.

The Buddha smiled and took his hand. Together they went to a temple
where two old monks were sweeping the floor. The Buddha said to
them: "This young monk will live here with you from now on.

Continue your sweeping, and as your brooms move back and forth,
listen and be aware of the sound of the broom as you sweep. "Don't
stop until I come back."

The young monk sat down and listened to the movement of the
brooms, to and fro over the floor. He heard the whispered rhythm of
the mantra as it was repeated over and over again. This went on for
many weeks, and before the Buddha came back, the young monk
had found full enlightenment and so had the two old monks (47).

Work Cited:

"The Buddha Speaks"
Author of 'Zen: Direct Pointing to Reality.'
Shambhala Publications, 2000
Chapter on Clarity
zenworm
2009-11-25 21:45:51 UTC
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Post by willytex
The Buddha smiled and took his hand. Together they went to a temple
where two old monks were sweeping the floor. The Buddha said to
them: "This young monk will live here with you from now on.
Continue your sweeping, and as your brooms move back and forth,
listen and be aware of the sound of the broom as you sweep. "Don't
stop until I come back."
The young monk sat down and listened to the movement of the
brooms, to and fro over the floor. He heard the whispered rhythm of
the mantra as it was repeated over and over again. This went on for
many weeks, and before the Buddha came back, the young monk
had found full enlightenment and so had the two old monks (47).
Does a Roomba have Buddha-nature?
Lee Rudolph
ROFLTT! (rolling on floor laughing to tears)


VrrRoomba!


ZN ;D
jubilation for no reason owned by no one
zenworm
2009-11-25 21:54:34 UTC
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Post by willytex
One day a bright and intelligent student of the Buddha asked if he
could
fetch his younger brother to join the order. Delighted, the Buddha
agreed.
But the younger brother, although kind and gentle, turned out to be
slow
and dull witted. He could understand nothing of his studies and asked
to
go home so that he wouldn't waste the Buddha's time or let down his
brother.
"There's no need for you to give up," said the Buddha. "You should
not
abandon your search for liberation just because you seem to yourself
to
be thick witted. You can drop all the philosophy you've been given
and
repeat a mantra instead - one that I will now give you."
He gave the young monk a mantra and sent him away affectionately.
But soon the monk was back, this time even more humiliated. "My
beloved Buddha, I can't remember the mantra you gave me and so I can
no longer practice."
The Buddha kindly repeated it for him. But twice more he came back,
having forgotten it each time. So the Buddha gave him a simplified
form.
But when this too slipped completely out of his mind, he hardly dared
visit the Buddha again. "There's an even shorter version," the Buddha
told him, with a smile, "It's just one syllable. See if you can
remember
that." But he could not.
In his hut, he broke down and wept. His brother found him and was
furious, feeling that his own reputation was now sullied. He told the
young monk to go home, and so the boy left the hut and sadly made his
way along the path. As he neared a grove of trees, he met the Buddha
coming from it.
The Buddha smiled and took his hand. Together they went to a temple
where two old monks were sweeping the floor. The Buddha said to
them: "This young monk will live here with you from now on.
Continue your sweeping, and as your brooms move back and forth,
listen and be aware of the sound of the broom as you sweep. "Don't
stop until I come back."
The young monk sat down and listened to the movement of the
brooms, to and fro over the floor. He heard the whispered rhythm of
the mantra as it was repeated over and over again. This went on for
many weeks, and before the Buddha came back, the young monk
had found full enlightenment and so had the two old monks (47).
"The Buddha Speaks"
Author of 'Zen: Direct Pointing to Reality.'
Shambhala Publications, 2000
Chapter on Clarity
great story

gratitude


ZN :D
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
Lee Rudolph
2009-11-25 21:36:02 UTC
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Post by willytex
The Buddha smiled and took his hand. Together they went to a temple
where two old monks were sweeping the floor. The Buddha said to
them: "This young monk will live here with you from now on.
Continue your sweeping, and as your brooms move back and forth,
listen and be aware of the sound of the broom as you sweep. "Don't
stop until I come back."
The young monk sat down and listened to the movement of the
brooms, to and fro over the floor. He heard the whispered rhythm of
the mantra as it was repeated over and over again. This went on for
many weeks, and before the Buddha came back, the young monk
had found full enlightenment and so had the two old monks (47).
Does a Roomba have Buddha-nature?

Lee Rudolph
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-26 16:29:03 UTC
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Post by willytex
The Buddha smiled and took his hand. Together they went to a temple
where two old monks were sweeping the floor. The Buddha said to
them: "This young monk will live here with you from now on.
Continue your sweeping, and as your brooms move back and forth,
listen and be aware of the sound of the broom as you sweep. "Don't
stop until I come back."
The young monk sat down and listened to the movement of the
brooms, to and fro over the floor. He heard the whispered rhythm of
the mantra as it was repeated over and over again. This went on for
many weeks, and before the Buddha came back, the young monk
had found full enlightenment and so had the two old monks (47).
Does a Roomba have Buddha-nature?
Lee Rudolph
maybe, but a moebius maze echo pathway
absorption negotiation agenda satisfaction
pursuit certainly does.
Lee Rudolph
2009-11-26 17:12:10 UTC
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...
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
The young monk sat down and listened to the movement of the
brooms, to and fro over the floor. He heard the whispered rhythm of
the mantra as it was repeated over and over again. This went on for
many weeks, and before the Buddha came back, the young monk
had found full enlightenment and so had the two old monks (47).
Does a Roomba have Buddha-nature?
Lee Rudolph
maybe, but a moebius maze echo pathway
absorption negotiation agenda satisfaction
pursuit certainly does.
There you go again, making sweeping generalizations.

Lee Rudolph
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-26 17:15:39 UTC
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Post by Lee Rudolph
...
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
The young monk sat down and listened to the movement of the
brooms, to and fro over the floor. He heard the whispered rhythm of
the mantra as it was repeated over and over again. This went on for
many weeks, and before the Buddha came back, the young monk
had found full enlightenment and so had the two old monks (47).
Does a Roomba have Buddha-nature?
Lee Rudolph
maybe, but a moebius maze echo pathway
absorption negotiation agenda satisfaction
pursuit certainly does.
There you go again, making sweeping generalizations.
Lee Rudolph
it's just my dustpan mind again
willytex
2009-11-26 18:22:03 UTC
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it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-27 03:50:49 UTC
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Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
maybe addiction duly noted.
what else ya got ?
Appledog
2009-11-27 15:58:03 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
maybe addiction duly noted.
what else ya got ?
True Understanding.

Wanna buy?

-
willytex
2009-11-27 16:22:58 UTC
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what else ya got?
Well, it struck me that your statement about the
dustpan and your mind was very similar to the
statement attributed to Shenxiu concerning the
idea of keeping the mirror clean so dust could
not collect on it.

In Zen literature, this view has been ascribed to
those who failed to understand the Bodhi mind.

Everyone knows that Huineng, the Sixth Patriarch
of Chán Buddhism in China, blew to bits the notion
that the Bodhi tree is a 'mind standing bright' and
that we must continually polish it.

Huineng advocated the 'direct apporach' to Buddhist
Chan practice and enlightenment. According to the
Sixth Patriarch:

"Bodhi is no tree,
nor is the mind a standing mirror bright.
Since all is originally empty,
where does the dust alight?"

Read more:

Dajian Huineng:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huineng

Your mind, your dustpan, and the dust you think
you see are just illusions created by false
knowledge. In reality, there is no mind, no
dustpan, and no dust - there is only Bodhi Mind
- nothing in it at all. Bodhi Mind is empty of
all discursive thoughts of dust and dust
collector appliances.

"Thus shall you think of this fleeting world:
A star at dawn, a bubble in a stream,
A flash of lightning in a summer cloud,
A flickering lamp, a phantom, and a dream."

Read more:

Diamond Sutra:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_Sutra
brian mitchell
2009-11-27 21:34:19 UTC
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. . . in reality there is no ... reality.
Ah, language! What would we do without it?
Keynes
2009-11-29 03:39:48 UTC
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Post by brian mitchell
. . . in reality there is no ... reality.
Ah, language! What would we do without it?
Well, in the morning I cough and blow my nose a lot.
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-27 20:23:42 UTC
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"willytex" <***@rwilliams.us> wrote in message news:90bdc09f-e635-4e39-87a9-***@l13g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...
Your mind, your dustpan, and the dust you think
you see are just illusions created by false
knowledge. In reality, there is no mind, no
dustpan, and no dust - there is only Bodhi Mind
- nothing in it at all. Bodhi Mind is empty of
all discursive thoughts of dust and dust
collector appliances.

------------------------------------------------

your statement, your bodhi mind and all
your concepts are just illusions created
by false knowledge. in reality there is no
bodhi mind, no concepts and no reality.
Keynes
2009-11-29 02:44:46 UTC
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Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
Regard life as simply a dust bunny, or maybe a puppy's mistake.
Brief as the flash of electricity from that frayed wire in your hand.
Like the smoke from the curtains and the flaming christmas tree.
Like the chime of a gonging smoke alarm, or a visit from the police.
Abide nowhere now that your house is gone. Live in the car.
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-29 02:51:56 UTC
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Post by Keynes
Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
Regard life as simply a dust bunny, or maybe a puppy's mistake.
Brief as the flash of electricity from that frayed wire in your hand.
Like the smoke from the curtains and the flaming christmas tree.
Like the chime of a gonging smoke alarm, or a visit from the police.
Abide nowhere now that your house is gone. Live in the car.
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
dick blisters
2009-11-29 04:51:44 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by Keynes
Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
Regard life as simply a dust bunny, or maybe a puppy's mistake.
Brief as the flash of electricity from that frayed wire in your hand.
Like the smoke from the curtains and the flaming christmas tree.
Like the chime of a gonging smoke alarm, or a visit from the police.
Abide nowhere now that your house is gone. Live in the car.
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
don't forget: ad lime and xtragin
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-29 04:58:35 UTC
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Post by dick blisters
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 10:22:03 -0800 (PST), willytex
Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
Regard life as simply a dust bunny, or maybe a puppy's mistake.
Brief as the flash of electricity from that frayed wire in your hand.
Like the smoke from the curtains and the flaming christmas tree.
Like the chime of a gonging smoke alarm, or a visit from the police.
Abide nowhere now that your house is gone. Live in the car.
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
don't forget: ad lime and xtragin
if you can't backwards mask don't
blame me for any less than tremendous
welcomes you might get.
dick blisters
2009-11-29 05:21:01 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by dick blisters
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
don't forget: ad lime and xtragin
if you can't backwards mask don't
blame me for any less than tremendous
welcomes you might get.
Huh?
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-29 05:30:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by dick blisters
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
don't forget: ad lime and xtragin
if you can't backwards mask don't
blame me for any less than tremendous
welcomes you might get.
Huh?
rights that
dick blisters
2009-11-29 05:56:39 UTC
Permalink
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by dick blisters
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
don't forget: ad lime and xtragin
if you can't backwards mask don't
blame me for any less than tremendous
welcomes you might get.
Huh?
rights that
I got no rights so I go one block past then make three lefts.
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-29 06:00:51 UTC
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Post by dick blisters
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by dick blisters
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
don't forget: ad lime and xtragin
if you can't backwards mask don't
blame me for any less than tremendous
welcomes you might get.
Huh?
rights that
I got no rights so I go one block past then make three lefts.
roam to lead roads all
zenworm
2009-11-29 06:30:12 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by Keynes
Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
Regard life as simply a dust bunny, or maybe a puppy's mistake.
Brief as the flash of electricity from that frayed wire in your hand.
Like the smoke from the curtains and the flaming christmas tree.
Like the chime of a gonging smoke alarm, or a visit from the police.
Abide nowhere now that your house is gone.  Live in the car.
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
not grateful for nothing?

what kind of slippers are you wearing?


ZN :D
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-29 06:41:20 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 10:22:03 -0800 (PST), willytex
Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
Regard life as simply a dust bunny, or maybe a puppy's mistake.
Brief as the flash of electricity from that frayed wire in your hand.
Like the smoke from the curtains and the flaming christmas tree.
Like the chime of a gonging smoke alarm, or a visit from the police.
Abide nowhere now that your house is gone. Live in the car.
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
not grateful for nothing?
or are you saying;
"nothing for grateful not?"
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
what kind of slippers are you wearing?
cute little bunny slippers
with lucky bunny tails.
zenworm
2009-11-29 07:12:05 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 10:22:03 -0800 (PST), willytex
Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
Regard life as simply a dust bunny, or maybe a puppy's mistake.
Brief as the flash of electricity from that frayed wire in your hand.
Like the smoke from the curtains and the flaming christmas tree.
Like the chime of a gonging smoke alarm, or a visit from the police.
Abide nowhere now that your house is gone. Live in the car.
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
not grateful for nothing?
or are you saying;
"nothing for grateful not?"
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
what kind of slippers are you wearing?
cute little bunny slippers
with lucky bunny tails.
fluffy!


ZN :D
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-29 07:50:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 10:22:03 -0800 (PST), willytex
Post by willytex
it's just my dustpan mind again-
But where, exactly, in your 'mind' is there
stubstance for dust to alight? Maybe you
have no mind. In which case, there would
be no substance or dust or pan.
Regard life as simply a dust bunny, or maybe a puppy's mistake.
Brief as the flash of electricity from that frayed wire in your hand.
Like the smoke from the curtains and the flaming christmas tree.
Like the chime of a gonging smoke alarm, or a visit from the police.
Abide nowhere now that your house is gone. Live in the car.
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
not grateful for nothing?
or are you saying;
"nothing for grateful not?"
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
what kind of slippers are you wearing?
cute little bunny slippers
with lucky bunny tails.
fluffy!
and they'd kick your frog slipper's
asses 9 ways to sunday.
willytex
2009-11-30 16:55:22 UTC
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Post by zenworm
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
Some very impressive comments!

But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-30 21:17:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by willytex
Post by zenworm
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
Some very impressive comments!
But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Lee Rudolph
2009-11-30 21:48:03 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
Post by zenworm
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
Some very impressive comments!
But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Wait. Isn't it the "no permanents" doctrine?

I mean, why else do monks bother to shave their heads?

Lee Rudolph
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-30 22:11:19 UTC
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Post by Lee Rudolph
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
Post by zenworm
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
Some very impressive comments!
But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Wait. Isn't it the "no permanents" doctrine?
I mean, why else do monks bother to shave their heads?
Lee Rudolph
avoiding permanent wave,
or maybe avoiding permanent
particle.
dick blisters
2009-11-30 23:15:25 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by Lee Rudolph
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
Post by zenworm
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
Some very impressive comments!
But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Wait. Isn't it the "no permanents" doctrine?
I mean, why else do monks bother to shave their heads?
Lee Rudolph
avoiding permanent wave,
or maybe avoiding permanent
particle.
must be how the super-stringy theory originated.....
^@%>---*=#**
2009-11-30 23:19:26 UTC
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Post by dick blisters
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by Lee Rudolph
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
Post by zenworm
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
Some very impressive comments!
But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Wait. Isn't it the "no permanents" doctrine?
I mean, why else do monks bother to shave their heads?
Lee Rudolph
avoiding permanent wave,
or maybe avoiding permanent
particle.
must be how the super-stringy theory originated.....
their quantum mechanics kit seems
to have some chromodynamic
screws loose.
willytex
2009-12-01 17:27:39 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Do you have any evidence that the historical
Buddha taught 'no permanence'?
^@%>---*=#**
2009-12-01 19:23:35 UTC
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Post by willytex
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Do you have any evidence that the historical
Buddha taught 'no permanence'?
just his signed affadavit
The historical Buddha wrote nothing; he was
apparently unable to read or write. So your
'affidavit' is probably a forgery. And so, is
not valid evidence. Anything else?
if buddha wrote nothing down
then all you have is hearsay too,
but you sure love to walk the
cock walk on top of that hearsay.

must be zen alpha male day
or something equally puerile.
Love
2009-12-02 07:53:08 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Do you have any evidence that the historical
Buddha taught 'no permanence'?
just his signed affadavit
The historical Buddha wrote nothing; he was
apparently unable to read or write. So your
'affidavit' is probably a forgery. And so, is
not valid evidence. Anything else?
if buddha wrote nothing down
then all you have is hearsay too,
but you sure love to walk the
cock walk on top of that hearsay.
must be zen alpha male day
or something equally puerile.
I'm not sure you're saying that like it's a bad thing.
--
Love

May Shai-Hulud clear the path before you.
^@%>---*=#**
2009-12-02 08:05:53 UTC
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Post by Love
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Do you have any evidence that the historical
Buddha taught 'no permanence'?
just his signed affadavit
The historical Buddha wrote nothing; he was
apparently unable to read or write. So your
'affidavit' is probably a forgery. And so, is
not valid evidence. Anything else?
if buddha wrote nothing down
then all you have is hearsay too,
but you sure love to walk the
cock walk on top of that hearsay.
must be zen alpha male day
or something equally puerile.
I'm not sure you're saying that like it's a bad thing.
willytex is yet another uselessnet denizen
who demands proof from others when he
has none for his own position. seems to be
quite an epidemic.
willytex
2009-12-02 18:58:47 UTC
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willytex is yet another uselessnet denizen
who demands proof from others when he
has none for his own position. seems to be
quite an epidemic.
Very impressive!
^@%>---*=#**
2009-12-02 19:24:17 UTC
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Post by willytex
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
willytex is yet another uselessnet denizen
who demands proof from others when he
has none for his own position. seems to be
quite an epidemic.
Very impressive!
true that hearsay bombadeer
willytex
2009-12-02 18:54:36 UTC
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Post by ^@%>---*=#**
The historical Buddha wrote nothing; he was
apparently unable to read or write. So your
'affidavit' is probably a forgery. And so, is not
valid evidence.
if buddha wrote nothing down
then all you have is hearsay too,
That's all we have - hearsay. That's just
about all anyone has - hearsay and sense
knowledge. None of us were there at the
time, so we can rule out sense experience.
But, verbal testimony is a valid means of
knowledge.
^@%>---*=#**
2009-12-01 18:26:48 UTC
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Post by willytex
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
Post by willytex
But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Do you have any evidence that the historical
Buddha taught 'no permanence'?
just his signed affadavit
willytex
2009-12-01 18:44:50 UTC
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Post by willytex
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Do you have any evidence that the historical
Buddha taught 'no permanence'?
just his signed affadavit
The historical Buddha wrote nothing; he was
apparently unable to read or write. So your
'affidavit' is probably a forgery. And so, is
not valid evidence. Anything else?
Love
2009-12-02 07:53:08 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by willytex
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
buddha taught the no permanence doctrine,
as such. what could be more permanent
than no permanence?
Do you have any evidence that the historical
Buddha taught 'no permanence'?
just his signed affadavit
The historical Buddha wrote nothing; he was
apparently unable to read or write. So your
'affidavit' is probably a forgery. And so, is
not valid evidence. Anything else?
Do you have any evidence that he was illiterate?

His taped testimony perhaps?

And please explain why an affidavit is not valid
evidence just because it's a forgery. I'll give
you a boost over the first obstacle: all we have
of the historical buddha could be forgery and we'd
still find the thought "historical buddha" valid.
--
Love

May Shai-Hulud clear the path before you.
willytex
2009-12-02 18:49:51 UTC
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Post by Love
The historical Buddha wrote nothing; he was
apparently unable to read or write. So your
'affidavit' is probably a forgery. And so, is
not valid evidence. Anything else?
Do you have any evidence that he was illiterate?
We have no evidence that the historical Buddha
wrote anything. We don't even know what language
he spoke. But, there is a reason he was called
'Shakya the Muni' - he didn't say anything at all.
All we know about the Buddha is based on
hearsay.
Lee Rudolph
2009-12-02 20:45:55 UTC
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Post by willytex
Post by Love
The historical Buddha wrote nothing; he was
apparently unable to read or write. So your
'affidavit' is probably a forgery. And so, is
not valid evidence. Anything else?
Do you have any evidence that he was illiterate?
We have no evidence that the historical Buddha
wrote anything. We don't even know what language
he spoke. But, there is a reason he was called
'Shakya the Muni' - he didn't say anything at all.
All we know about the Buddha is based on
hearsay.
If, indeed, he said nothing, it may be based on "say"
but it ain't based on "hearsay".

Lee Rudolph
zenworm
2009-12-02 21:10:13 UTC
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Post by Lee Rudolph
Post by willytex
Post by Love
The historical Buddha wrote nothing; he was
apparently unable to read or write. So your
'affidavit' is probably a forgery. And so, is
not valid evidence. Anything else?
Do you have any evidence that he was illiterate?
We have no evidence that the historical Buddha
wrote anything. We don't even know what language
he spoke. But, there is a reason he was called
'Shakya the Muni' - he didn't say anything at all.
All we know about the Buddha is based on
hearsay.
If, indeed, he said nothing, it may be based on "say"
but it ain't based on "hearsay".
Lee Rudolph
unspoken


ZN :D
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
willytex
2009-12-03 15:15:48 UTC
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Post by Lee Rudolph
Post by willytex
We have no evidence that the historical Buddha
wrote anything. We don't even know what language
he spoke. But, there is a reason he was called
'Shakya the Muni' - he didn't say anything at all.
All we know about the Buddha is based on
hearsay.
If, indeed, he said nothing, it may be based on "say"
but it ain't based on "hearsay".
Well, maybe the historical Buddha did say "nothing",
but not in English. He may have used some common
Prakrit, but we don't know which one. According to the
scriptures, he may have used a word similar to the
Sanskrit word "s'u-nyata" for "nothing".

But even if the Buddha could read and write, we don't have
any of his writings - nothing that he wrote has survived.
This isn't surprising, since the invention of the alphabet
and writing didn't occur in India until the time of Asoka.

All we know about the historical Buddha comes from
the records compiled 200 years after the Buddha's
Parinirvana. So, what we know about the Buddha is
derived from verbal testimony, i.e., hearsay.

So, there must be a reason the Buddha was called
Shakya the Muni - ususally the munis don't talk
very much. I wouldn't be surprised if it turns out that
all the scriptures were actually uttered by Sariputra
or some of the other followers. Maybe the Buddha
used hand signals, I don't know.
zenworm
2009-11-30 22:25:08 UTC
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Post by willytex
Post by zenworm
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
Some very impressive comments!
But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
smile, wave...

ocean


ZN :D
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
zenworm
2009-12-01 05:19:50 UTC
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Post by willytex
Post by zenworm
Post by ^@%>---*=#**
i tell god, either kill me now
or give me a break. this middle
of the road horseshit may have
worked for buddha thousands
of years ago but to me its just
tedium felicity ad nauseum ad
infinitum.
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
Some very impressive comments!
But did the historical Buddha teach the 'permanence' or the
'infinity' doctrine? I think not.
is Buddha nature impermanent?



ZN :D
absolute permanent perfection overflowing without action
willytex
2009-11-26 18:17:50 UTC
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...the young monk had found full enlightenment
and so had the two old monks.
Does a Roomba have Buddha-nature?
So, Lee, you don't have all the answers.
Lee Rudolph
2009-11-26 19:13:43 UTC
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Post by willytex
...the young monk had found full enlightenment
and so had the two old monks.
Does a Roomba have Buddha-nature?
So, Lee, you don't have all the answers.
I *had* them, but they must have fallen under the davenport,
or something.

Lee Rudolph (and the dustpuppies were enlightened)
willytex
2009-12-06 16:55:38 UTC
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One day a bright and intelligent student of the Buddha asked if he
could fetch his younger brother to join the order. Delighted, the
Buddha
agreed.

But the younger brother, although kind and gentle, turned out to be
slow and dull witted. He could understand nothing of his studies and
asked to go home so that he wouldn't waste the Buddha's time or let
down his brother.

"There's no need for you to give up," said the Buddha. "You should not
abandon your search for liberation just because you seem to yourself
to be thick witted. You can drop all the philosophy you've been given
and repeat a mantra instead - one that I will now give you."

He gave the young monk a mantra and sent him away affectionately.

But soon the monk was back, this time even more humiliated. "My
beloved Buddha, I can't remember the mantra you gave me and so I can
no longer practice."

The Buddha kindly repeated it for him. But twice more he came back,
having forgotten it each time. So the Buddha gave him a simplified
form.

But when this too slipped completely out of his mind, he hardly dared
visit the Buddha again. "There's an even shorter version," the Buddha
told him, with a smile, "It's just one syllable. See if you can
remember that." But he could not.

In his hut, he broke down and wept. His brother found him and was
furious, feeling that his own reputation was now sullied. He told the
young monk to go home, and so the boy left the hut and sadly made his
way along the path. As he neared a grove of trees, he met the Buddha
coming from it.

The Buddha smiled and took his hand. Together they went to a temple
where two old monks were sweeping the floor. The Buddha said to them:
"This young monk will live here with you from now on.

Continue your sweeping, and as your brooms move back and forth, listen
and be aware of the sound of the broom as you sweep. "Don't stop until
I come back."

The young monk sat down and listened to the movement of the brooms, to
and fro over the floor. He heard the whispered rhythm of the mantra as
it was repeated over and over again. This went on for many weeks, and
before the Buddha came back, the young monk had found full
enlightenment and so had the two old monks (47).

Work Cited:

"The Buddha Speaks"
Author of 'Zen: Direct Pointing to Reality.'
Shambhala Publications, 2000
Chapter on Clarity
daletx
2009-12-06 17:56:57 UTC
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Post by willytex
One day a bright and intelligent student of the Buddha asked if he
could fetch his younger brother to join the order. Delighted, the
Buddha
agreed.
Wow, it's like dejavunews all over again. Didn't this story go around
just a few weeks ago?

DT
Ned Ludd
2009-12-06 18:12:10 UTC
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Post by daletx
Post by willytex
One day a bright and intelligent student of the Buddha asked if he
could fetch his younger brother to join the order. Delighted, the
Buddha
agreed.
Wow, it's like dejavunews all over again. Didn't this story go around
just a few weeks ago?
DT
Yes, on Nov. 25,
Sept. 9, 2006
Jun. 25, 2005
Jan. 16, 2004
and Sep. 19, 2000

Ned
willytex
2009-12-06 22:45:32 UTC
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Post by willytex
One day a bright and intelligent student of the Buddha asked if he
could fetch his younger brother to join the order. Delighted, the
Buddha agreed.
Didn't this story go around just a few weeks ago?
It's been going around since about 491 B.C. I think.

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