Discussion:
orderliness of the Sanskrit language
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robert roberts
2009-12-28 12:29:38 UTC
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"The perfect orderliness of the Sanskrit language creates orderliness and
balance in the brain physiology, expands the memory, and purifies the
physiology. When reciting the Vedic language, the brain functions from more
silent levels, increasing peace and harmony in the mind." - Maharishi Mahesh
Yogi
Bhairitu
2009-12-28 18:16:05 UTC
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Post by robert roberts
"The perfect orderliness of the Sanskrit language creates orderliness and
balance in the brain physiology, expands the memory, and purifies the
physiology. When reciting the Vedic language, the brain functions from more
silent levels, increasing peace and harmony in the mind." - Maharishi Mahesh
Yogi
It's thought to be an "engineered" language. IOW, at some point things
were such a mess linguistically that some king probably had some group
create it. The Korean language was engineered and is called the
"morning language" because the characters can be learned in one morning
session.

English is a mongrel language with many influences in it. That's what
happens when a language evolves. Baring a world war we will at some
point need a common language for the world since we communicating more
daily on a global basis. It would be best to start from scratch and
engineer one that people can learn easily.
robert roberts
2009-12-28 20:16:36 UTC
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Post by Bhairitu
It's thought to be an "engineered" language.
This is thought by whom?
Post by Bhairitu
IOW, at some point things were such a mess linguistically that some king
probably had some group create it.
The Korean language was engineered and is called the "morning language"
because the characters can be learned in one morning session.
Please explain what you mean by "engineered"? I am not a linguistics scholar
and am unfamiliar with this term.
Post by Bhairitu
English is a mongrel language with many influences in it. That's what
happens when a language evolves. Baring a world war we will at some point
need a common language for the world since we communicating more daily on
a global basis. It would be best to start from scratch and engineer one
that people can learn easily.
Why start from scratch if English is already morphing into a common global
language?

thanx
Bhairitu
2009-12-28 22:03:07 UTC
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Post by robert roberts
Post by Bhairitu
It's thought to be an "engineered" language.
This is thought by whom?
Most scholars I've spoken with and read on the subject.
Post by robert roberts
Post by Bhairitu
IOW, at some point things were such a mess linguistically that some king
probably had some group create it.
The Korean language was engineered and is called the "morning language"
because the characters can be learned in one morning session.
Please explain what you mean by "engineered"? I am not a linguistics scholar
and am unfamiliar with this term.
Languages tended to emerge out of older languages that fall into disuse
or when foreigners invaded and tried to force their language on the
people. Hindi has a lot of Sanskrit base in it (Devanagari is a script
not the language) but it also has a lot of Arabic (i.e. a character for
"z" was added) and sometimes Hindi speakers just drop into English which
is pretty much the second language of India.

The logic of the language (which MMY was referring to) suggests it is an
engineered language. Do you think it was cognized or something like that?
Post by robert roberts
Post by Bhairitu
English is a mongrel language with many influences in it. That's what
happens when a language evolves. Baring a world war we will at some point
need a common language for the world since we communicating more daily on
a global basis. It would be best to start from scratch and engineer one
that people can learn easily.
Why start from scratch if English is already morphing into a common global
language?
thanx
Because English is hard to learn. Too many words are spelled as if we
were speaking Old English. "Through" is pronounced like "threw." Such
dated spellings need to go. But it is a language which emerged out of
several. I'm no linguistic expert but I have read and heard interviews
on the subject. And I've studied French, Sanskrit, Hindi and Spanish.
When you start studying languages you begin to see concepts that make a
language like Spanish easier to learn than English. Or why for example
with so many Teutonic roots in English, German was the language of
choice to study when I went to high school because that made it easier
for English speakers to learn. I wound up in French class instead and
back then taught by teachers who were more into French culture than how
to teach someone the language. :D
robert roberts
2009-12-29 03:12:24 UTC
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I wound up in French class instead and
back then taught by teachers who were more into French culture than how to
teach someone the language. :D
This would seem to be a bonus. Do you think it was more beneficial than just
being taught the language?
Bhairitu
2009-12-29 17:28:38 UTC
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Post by Bhairitu
I wound up in French class instead and
back then taught by teachers who were more into French culture than how to
teach someone the language. :D
This would seem to be a bonus. Do you think it was more beneficial than just
being taught the language?
No because they seemed to have only one way to teach the language. True
language teachers may know several methods because some people learn
language differently. The way it was taught back then was certainly not
the way one might learn with Rosetta Stone or similar systems.

I also bought the DK "Teach Yourself Hindi" book which I thought was
easy and excellent. So I bought their Spanish book thinking I would get
the same and it was no where well thought out nor easy. Some people can
teach and some can't.

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